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tv   HAR Dtalk on the Road in France  BBC News  October 11, 2017 4:30am-5:01am BST

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more than 150 others are missing — although that may be a result of the chaotic pace of evacuations. one of the worst affected towns is santa rosa where entire districts have been gutted. catalonia's president has signed a declaration of independence but suspended secession to give space for dialogue with spain's central government. the independence referendum was illegal under spain's constitution, and the government in madrid immediately rejected his statements. it will hold an emergency cabinet meeting on wednesday. the hollywood producer harvey weinstein has now been accused of sexual harassment by some of hollywood's biggest stars — angelina jolie, gwyneth paltrow, and mira sorvino. and the italian film star, asia argento, and two other women claim he raped them, according to an investigation by the new yorker magazine. now it's time for hardtalk. (music playing). france has been
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stuck in a rut for a long time. ripe for a fall. we know that we want to change a lot of things but we did not want an economy totally tied down. it sounds like you are in love with emmanuel macron. down. it sounds like you are in love with emmanuel macronli down. it sounds like you are in love with emmanuel macron. i think, especially for the young people, he can bring hope to them. look out for the teeth of the great panthers. yes, you are dangerous? president emmanuel macron is intent on reform. he wants to open up the economy, deregulate it, a form of shock therapy in economy, but can these
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new young president take his country with him. this chain is real and may be brutal? not brutal, dynamic. chant. street demonstrations are smart as pa rt street demonstrations are smart as part of life as they get and wine. the science is look out for the teeth of the great panthers. are you angry? very angry. what you think of mr macron? not good at all. old people in france have been a little
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bit grumpy when they see things that are not like and what they do not like right now is emmanuel macron and his plan to tax their pensions. better off pensioners will be hit ha rd est. better off pensioners will be hit hardest. ironically, any of these grey—haired protesters voted for young mr macronjust grey—haired protesters voted for young mr macron just a few months ago. the increase of tax is totally unfair because it is concentrated on one portion of the population.“ you do not mind me asking, how much money are you going to lose? 100,000 euros a year. do you think it will change your life as mac somehow. he completely neglected the farms. you voted to him in the presidential election, would you vote for him ain? election, would you vote for him again? probably a white vote. at
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stein. at stein, exactly. —— abstained. the french president is yet to turn a0 but he is a man in a hurry. en marche, his political movement broke the mould. some seem as clinton, blair, an open flexible entrepreneurial front his aim. —— france. the french national assembly is rich in tradition. it is also now dominated by a new breed of mps, mostly successful professionals from business and public service drawn to the banner of reform. a pilot, an executive in the private jet business, this man abandoned his
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business, this man abandoned his business for a seat in parliament after being persuaded. business for a seat in parliament after being persuadedlj business for a seat in parliament after being persuaded. i met the president 2.5 years ago. i thought he was different from the politicians i got to know at the time. a lot more careful and responsive than the other politicians. i kept that in mind. in december i read the political platform. in january december i read the political platform. injanuary i decided to run. i got nominated in may. but you area run. i got nominated in may. but you are a pilot, you do not know anything about politics. are a pilot, you do not know anything about politicslj are a pilot, you do not know anything about politics. i know the administration, how it works and its limits. because i am an entrepreneur, i know what the social climate is. what tax and legal issues are. this is the university of life, so to say and this can be taken into of life, so to say and this can be ta ken into politics. of life, so to say and this can be taken into politics. we can bring something different. obviously, we
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do not pretend we want to be politicians for the rest of our lives and that is a strength, not a weakness. if you look at the breakdown of en marche mps, you are overwhelmingly, about 70%, from the upper middle class, you are not representative of all france. there are still some gaps to be filled. it isa are still some gaps to be filled. it is a commitment we have but i can only say that. as we sit here, fronts is being polarised. —— france. the new demonstrations, do you think, france is fighting the same old battles at it will be the same old battles at it will be the same results? this is a democracy and it is also a way of democracy
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which france producers because there isa which france producers because there is a reluctance for reform. how do you overcome that? we hope that if we produce properly, the public opinion will say ok, that happen. the message is, france is back. erich bonnet is back also. thank you for inviting me. we moved two days ago. this is rand new four-year? -- brand. his office has been in london for the past two years but he has decided to move back to paris. still unpacking. partly, it is about worries over brexit but mostly
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driven by an enthusiasm for macron economic policy. he plans to lower corporate tax to 25% within the next five years... and when you were here? 3396. five years... and when you were here? 33%. 1896 in five years... and when you were here? 3396. 1896 in the uk, 2096 in the coming years. more interesting in the uk but you have other advantages in paris and france. real estate is less expensive. schools are more affordable. how many staff would you employ? a total staff of nine. within these nine, eight will be in this office at the beginning of january. is it important to you that emmanuel macron and his labour
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reforms mean you do not have to deal with trade unions, you more flexibility about how you acquire and fire and employees. it is not a big difference but it is significant. also the flat tax is very clear and simple. 30% flat tax. it sounds like you are in love with emmanuel macron stop i am very enthusiastic. i have lived in london and meta enthusiastic. i have lived in london and met a lot of wealthy people but also a lot of young non— wealthy people working in restaurants simply because they wanted to have a job. i think macron will bring hope to these new generation also. paris may look an changing but it is not. like
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any major city, the main driver is the economy. the uber taxi app has long been controversial. they even have a phrase which captures french concern about what the new economy is doing to traditionaljobs. this man is an uber driverfor one of paris ‘s poorer drivers. —— areas. he takes me to his old turf. a neighbourhood with a high immigrant
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population, widespread poverty and skyhigh youth unemployment. reform isa skyhigh youth unemployment. reform is a word that resonate here as well. inafunny in a funny sort of way, it seems to me you are exactly the kind of guy that emmanuel macron believes in. you are highly flexible.. do you have faith that lets say in
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five years from now, five years of emmanuel macron's reforms, can really change the lives of people in this neighbourhood ? take the train south, out of paris, and a different france comes into view. metropolitan attitudes do not
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a lwa ys view. metropolitan attitudes do not always travel well. this is my first time here. ijourneyed to a region for a different take on france's situation. home to 19,000 people, a country town shaped by farming, small business and traditional values. just outside town, the tobacco harvest is in full swing. this region has long grown the leaf and these days in imports have taken over by here they make a tidy profit. is it true to say that tobacco farming and growing is really pa rt tobacco farming and growing is really part of the tradition of the communities around here? really part of the tradition of the communities around here ?“
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really part of the tradition of the communities around here? it was. it was because today, unfortunately, it is almost over because every manufacturer closed. they prefer to buy at the tobacco were it is less expensive, in europe. it is not easy to businesses in france to maximise their profits because, for example, labour costs and the market is more difficult here than it is, for example, in poland. it is. for sure but it depends if you want quality as well. i think quality is important. and the tradition and the community. yes. some of these words are social words, not economic words. yes, but i think we can combine and we can work with the
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social part and the liberal economic part, i think. one social part and the liberal economic part, ithink. one of social part and the liberal economic part, i think. one of the biggest industries is this. the company shut down earlier this year. france is last cigarette factory. workers put up last cigarette factory. workers put up crosses last cigarette factory. workers put up crosses outside the factory to everyjob gone. 2a9 of them. france has one of the highest unemployment rates in the western world. of the in an industrial estate beside sound, i met up with some former imperial employees, request in that the factory be reopened. —— in an industrial estate besides, i met up with some former imperial
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employees, request in that the factory be reopened. backin back in the national assembly, battle lines are being drawn up for a prolonged struggle over emmanuel macron's reforms. he started with the labour laws, but will include pensions benefits, tax and more. new voices are emerging on the left, to challenge emmanuel macron's ascendance. we challenge emmanuel macron's ascendance . we are challenge emmanuel macron's ascendance. we are not defending the status quo. we are saying that a manual macron is the status quo, obeying the eu mandate, which is to break under labour laws. what we're saying is that there are alternatives to this way. if you
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look at how france's responding, your party, the trade unions have called for big demonstrations to show that the country rejects a manual macron's approach. but the demonstrations had not been that big. you on the left are not winning this argument. let me remind you that the vast majority of the population is against the reform. opinion polls show that. we don't trust that this reform will help them find a job, because they are aware of what is being attacked. but you are filling them with propaganda, telling them that this will be the most disastrous thing that has ever happened. the people, especially the workers, know by experience. they note the reality, and that is that it is no more flexibility ofjobs. isn't and that is that it is no more flexibility of jobs. isn't the truth that you don't like the presidential style of emmanuel macron, that you accuse him of being almost some sort of king, and that is an argument
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about style, not an argument about substance? the thing is the government and the president has made — his entire particle reply is actually about style, a sort of jupitarian president. and jupitarian president zuma means a guy that wa nts to president zuma means a guy that wants to get things done. everybody wa nts to wants to get things done. everybody wants to get things done. everybody wants to get things done. everybody wants to get things done, but we don't agree with the way that he was to get things done. —— president simply means a guide. emmanuel macron's honeymoon with voter lasted no time at all. his approval ratings have plunged as he has pushed through his first reforms. will this be another case of reformist
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ambition thwarted? inside the french government, there is, as yet, no sign of panic. they have a mandate, and they have the optimism that comes with being political outsiders. europe minister natalie lowe so is a technocrat that believes the reforms will prevail. —— nathalie loiseau. we have various cuts, and various increases. too many in this country, this looks a policy programme of reform that favours the well—to—do. policy programme of reform that favours the well-to-do. except there are many measures that you have not described in favour of the weakest pa rt described in favour of the weakest part of the population. we are increasing the minimum pension for
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the eldest. we are increasing the activity premium that we are giving to people who are entering jobs. of course, when you downsize taxes, you are giving advantage to people who pay taxes. and these are the richest in the population. half of the population doesn't pay the income tax in france. but this idea of privatising, with year won a rush to cut corporate tax, cut property tax, where it as some of the more socially driven measures to help poorer folks are spread over the five years. no, they start already. there will be 15 billion euros dedicated to vocational training. there will be a shock in terms of helping people not dealing with unemployment. we have been very good at paying a lot of money for curing the diseases of our society. we
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would very much prefer to prevent these diseases. we have to encourage greater morejobs, these diseases. we have to encourage greater more jobs, and for this, these diseases. we have to encourage greater morejobs, and for this, we need investment, and reflectivity. those kinds of words, particularly words like flexibility, to worry some people. they have it had been union demonstrations. not so many, as you have seen. but perhaps you have seen the most recent poll, where the 65% of people think the reforms around there. 59% believe they will not revival of the economy or ease the situation in the country. and 4996 say it is too early to have any sort ofjudgement. because we have just started, and we are starting the tough measures, because we found a budget that was really a huge problem for our country. so we had to take tough decisions. better to take them now than not to take them at all. you don't think emmanuel macron cares that his approval rating has slumped from sticky % to a0%? that his approval rating has slumped from sticky 96 to 4096? we are not
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expecting to have good polls every day, but we are expecting him to ta ke day, but we are expecting him to take good decisions. —— 60% to a0%. emmanuel macron is a man clearly a hurry. he has talked about wanting a jupitarian presidency, with godlike powers to change france. jeez mate this is not a godlike power. when he mentioned jupiter, he said he had to give a sentient to action. -- this is not a godlike power. —— a sense to action. let me put it this way. the figure was wise for the president to rail against, quote, slackers and cynics? the target of politicians who have done nothing for years. and he was right for that. 0k, for years. and he was right for that. ok, well finally, then, talk about macron's style, in this poll,
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it is said that certain group c his style as a slap in the face and evidence that presidents don't care. duty is to be careful moving forward ? duty is to be careful moving forward? you have to be careful doing nothing. —— you think he needs to be careful moving forward. so this change is definite and going to be brutal? it is not brutal. it is going to be dynamic. a manual macron must always realise that winning the presidency was the easy part. —— a manual macron. reforming france, that has barely began. —— emmanuel macron. hello there.
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we have a wet wednesday on the cards for some western parts of the british isles. some heavy rain, some strong winds, as well, courtesy of a slow—moving weatherfront, an area of low pressure drifting to the north—west of the british isles. this front here really dragging its heels, as it pushes its way south and east. so in some places it will rain for pretty much all day long. now, down to the south—west of england, could be some patchy rainfirst thing. but a lot of dry weather at 8:00am in the morning, and that dry theme extends further east, as well. certainly across south—east england and east anglia we'll see some spells of sunshine. fairly large areas of cloud floating around, as well. temperatures around ia degrees. similar story for the midlands. north—east england getting off to a mainly dry start, particularly close to the east coast. similar story for northern scotland, although some hefty showers will be packing in here.
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south—west scotland having a wet start. pretty miserable rush hour in glasgow. rain moving across northern ireland for a time, but the wettest weather will be across north wales and the north—west of england. and here, with a south—westerly wind just funnelling this rain in across the same places for hour upon hour upon hour, especially over high ground, could see 50mm to 80mm of rain, maybe 100mm or more for some of the hills of cumbria. could be enough to give some issues with localised flooding, and the winds will be strong — could be gales in exposed spots. so our band of rain only slowly moving southwards and eastwards. behind it, something brighter for scotland and northern ireland, but some hefty showers, too. staying largely dry down towards the south—east, but often fairly cloudy, and temperatures of ia to 17 degrees. but our slow—moving weather front finally gets its act together during wednesday night, pushing off to the east. and, behind it, it'll leave largely clear skies. could be the odd fog patch here and there, and particularly in the south, where the winds fall light, it could turn a little bit chilly. some spots in the countryside maybe down to four or five degrees. thursday, then, a decent day. certainly a drier day for north—east
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england and north wales. many of us fine, with some spells of sunshine. thicker cloud, though, for northern ireland and northern and western scotland. some outbreaks of rain here later — 12—17 degrees. that cloud in the north—west will then sink its way into the picture on friday. another band of heavy rain, this one also quite slow—moving. the further south you are, though, particularly if you get some sunshine, your temperatures could get up to 20 degrees. a sign of what is to come for the weekend — warm air wafting up from the south. and, if the sun does come out, we could get to 23 degrees. but it will always be cooler, with some rain, towards the north—west. this is bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: spain rejects the offer of talks over the future of catalonia, as the region's leader avoids an immediate declaration of independence. fresh allegations against harvey weinstein —
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the hollywood producer denies claims he raped three women. and just when they needed it most, a magical messi hat—trick drags argentina into the world cup finals. hello, i'm sally bundock. saving north american trade — president trump and canada's prime minister trudeau meet, as tensions rise over the region's $1 trillion pact. and a scandal deepens at another majorjapanese supplier to the world's biggest car companies shares in kobe steel plunge.
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